Archive for December, 2012

“For years, nothing seemed capable of turning around New Dorp High School’s dismal performance—not firing bad teachers, not flashy education technology, not after-school programs. So, faced with closure, the school’s principal went all-in on a very specific curriculum reform, placing an overwhelming focus on teaching the basics of analytic writing, every day, in virtually every class.”

The Writing Revolution

Random House and Penguin Merger Creates Global Giant

Please let them call the new company Random Penguin House.

heartburn

Heartburn

by Nora Ephron

 

Chit-chatty

Honest

Sharp

#threewordbookreviews

 

 

 

“Vera said ‘why do you feel you have to turn everything into a story?’ So I told her why: Because if I tell the story I control the version. Because if I tell the story, I can make you laugh, and I would rather have you laugh at me than feel sorry for me. Because if I tell the story, it doesn’t hurt as much. Because if I tell the story, I can get on with it.”

“As novelists, we should ask or imply a question at the beginning of the story, and then we should delay the answer. (Which is what I did here, and you’re still reading, right?)”

How to create suspense

 

“Anything can be rewritten—except nothing.” — Joss Whedon

“Remember this: writer’s block doesn’t exist. What does exist is a condition in which you don’t really know what you’re trying to say, and therefore are having trouble saying it.” — Susan Orlean

“I have only one fear in life, and that is of writing.” — Fran Lebowitz

“The internet is not your friend. The internet wants you to do excessive online browsing. The internet wants you to scroll through Tumblr until your wrists hurt. The internet wants you to read other people’s writing. The internet wants you to have 30 tabs up at once that you can’t possibly close until you’ve read every single link from the Wikipedia page on zombies. You have to peel yourself away from the internet.” — Jenny Zhang

Getting Unstuck: Writers’ thoughts on writer’s block.

“Forty-six-year-old Jeff Ingram has a rare type of amnesia called dissociative fugue. When he has an attack, his memory is wiped clean and he doesn’t remember who he is or where he’s from.”

Love in the Time of Amnesia

“Defining Moments: In politics, culture, sports and more, these words spiked in lookups because of events in the news.”

2012: The Year in Words

Oh, Library of Congress

Oh Library of Congress

 The Family Fang

infuriating

odd

touching

#threewordbookreviews

 

 

 

 

 

Well, that was a healthy shopping trip

Well, that was a healthy shopping trip